Looking for Ibn Zaydun

Does anyone know what this poem is?

Here is a partial quotation from a Jordanian named Zaydoun. His namesake was the poet Ibn Zaydun from Spain who was famous for loving a princess. The Ibn Zaydun poem fragment is something like “We used to meet…our meeting” the last word being the Arabic word “deena” (?) (meeting).  Apparently the first two lines of the poem are somewhat famous in Arabic and are studied extensively in Syria.

A cursory review 9f a few google books shows Ibn Zaydun was the great poet that set the standard for judging later poets.  So far I have tracked down the quite short Wikipedia article about Ibn Zaydun, a tantalizing tourism biography, and a few lines of a poem from Syrian (?) blogger MoCo:

God has sent showers upon the abandoned dwelling places of those we loved. He has woven upon them a striped, many colored garment of flowers, and raised among them a flower like a star. How many girls like images trailed their garments among such flowers, when life was fresh and time was at our service… How happy they were, those days that have passed, days of pleasure, when we lived with those who had black, flowing hair and white shoulders… Now say to Destiny whose favors have vanished – favors i have lamented as the nights have passed – how faintly its breeze has touched me in my evening. but for him who walks in the night the stars still shine: greetings to you, Cordoba, with love and longing.

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4 Responses to “Looking for Ibn Zaydun”

  1. Emad Says:

    سقي الغيث أطلال الأحبة بالحمي وحاك عليها ثوب وشي منمنما

    • Nijma Says:

      Google Translate renders the above سقي الغيث أطلال الأحبة بالحمي وحاك عليها ثوب وشي منمنما as “Watering rain ruins loved by fever and itchy dress Shi Mnmnma”. Is this perhaps the Arabic for the first line of the above translated poem fragment: “God has sent showers upon the abandoned dwelling places of those we loved. He has woven upon them a striped, many colored garment of flowers“?

  2. Emad Says:

    Yes it is the first line. It seems that you do not speak Arabic. Is this true?


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