Camel accuses Obama campaign of Fearmongering and Shameful, Offensive Drudgery

drudge2.jpgWhile the rest of the blogosphere was busy bickering about the picture of Barack Obama in Kenyan attire that went viral after appearing on the Drudge Report this week, and their claim that it came from someone in the Clinton campaign, and the Obama campaign’s response that it was “shameful offensive fear-mongering”, the Camel’s Nose has obtained an exclusive email from a camel that claims it was subjected to “shameful offensive Drudgery” by none other than Senator Obama himself.

While the other blogs frequently don’t do their homework and print things without knowing whether or not they are true, that will never happen here at the Camel’s Nose. Everything here is double-checked five ways from Sunday.

At first I was skeptical about this camel thing. After all, the email from the camel in question was received by a little-known Republican blog, whose name escapes me at the moment. And the Senator is a Democrat. If someone wanted to discredit him, isn’t that just what they would do? Give a fake email to some Republicans and say it came from who-knows-where. By the time it all got sorted out, the damage would have been done. Well, I’m not going to fall for that crap. I sort things out first. And besides, I’ve never heard of a camel that was able to send emails.

barack-camel-wajid-kenya-8-27-06.jpgBut then, a few things started to fall into place. First, miraculously, an exhaustive examination of the Obama campaign’s cache memory turned up the information that the senator had actually been in the camel’s hometown of Wajid, Kenya on 8/27/06, the exact day when the official campaign photographers were so very attentive and the rest of the press said the senator was busy getting his African sartorial lesson.

Now, surprise, surprise, surprise, a photo of the incident with the actual camel has come to light. No doubt about it. The camel is NOT happy.

But why? Inquiring minds want to know, so we checked further.

Here’s the information we uncovered, from another stop the senator made in Nairobi, Kenya.

barack-nairobi-kenya-kibera-slum-8-27-06.jpgWhat is he saying to the crowd? According to the purloined email, Obama is shouting, “Can you eat camels?” And the crowd is shouting back, “Yes we can.”

Talk about divisive fear-mongering…

Extra credit if you can spot the photographer from the Clinton campaign who took that Drudge Report photo in this 2006 Nairobi crowd scene.

Update: Finally someone who says something about this whole thing that makes sense–the local BBC guy, Yusuf Garaad Omar, head of the BBC’s Somali Service explains the meaning of the costume. “They have a council for Peace and Development, and when they get delegates they dress them as a nomadic person.” Cool.  The American senator shows up and gets the standard Council Delegate Treatment.   I should hope so.

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Posted in Camels, Election 2008, Humor, Obama. Tags: , , , , . Comments Off on Camel accuses Obama campaign of Fearmongering and Shameful, Offensive Drudgery

Fifteen Hundred Saudi Camels Compete for Miss Camel Title

camelbeauties2.jpgSaudi women could never be subjected to the indignity of a beauty pageant, but Saudi camels aren’t so lucky. This week, camels are competing in the Mazayen al-Ibl competition of the Qahtani tribe, according to a Reuters article.

“The camels are divided into four categories according to breed — the black majaheem, white maghateer, dark brown shi’l and the sufur, which are beige with black shoulders.”

There’s big money in it too. Sponsors have provided 10 million riyals ($2.7 million) for the contest, and the winner can receive one of 72 sports utility vehicles. Now how is a camel going to drive an SUV?

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Related posts:
Camel cheese doesn’t play in Mauritania
Wild Camels in the Desert: Legacy of the U.S. Army Camel Corps
My new camel avatar
The Ship of the Desert at Wadi Rhum (photo)
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Camel cheese doesn’t play in Mauritania

“For Mauritanians cheese is simply milk gone sour. They think it’s revolting,” says Nancy Abeiderrahmane, the owner of Tiviski dairy in this northwestern African country. The dairy produces milk from camels, cows and goats plus yogurt, but their specialty is camel’s cheese, according to an article in the April 10, 2007 online edition of the Jordan Times.

I don’t know about camel cheese, but camel milk is pretty good. If you have a cup of tea with fresh mint you can mix it half and half with camel milk, fresh from the camel. Obviously it’s not pasteurized when you drink it like this. I’m not entirely sure what the risk is from unpasteurized camel milk, but I have had plenty of unpasteurized cow milk in American farm homes and never heard of anyone getting sick from milk in a home environment.
Camel cheese looks like the soft, round French Camembert, but is said to taste like goat cheese. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation says it has three times as much vitamin C as cow’s milk, and also has significant amounts of vitamin B and iron.

Abeiderrahmane has potential customers for her unique camel cheese lined up at European department stores like Harrods in London and Fauchon in Paris, but has not been able to start exporting camel cheese because of the EU regulations. Mauritania has not eliminated hoof and mouth disease, and the country lacks laboratories for testing animal health.

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Related posts:
Fifteen Hundred Saudi Camels Compete for Miss Camel Title
Wild Camels in the Desert: Legacy of the U.S. Army Camel Corps
My new camel avatar
The Ship of the Desert at Wadi Rhum (photo)
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Posted in Arab culture, Camels. Comments Off on Camel cheese doesn’t play in Mauritania

Wild Camels in the Desert: Legacy of the U.S. Army Camel Corps

Wild camels once roamed American’s southwest. Oh not the original ones. The first camels that evolved on this continent traveled the land bridge to Asia, leaving only their cousins the llamas behind in the New World.

The camels I’m talking about were part of the U.S. Camel Corps, brought over as ancamel-loading-gh-heap.jpg experiment in controlling transportation costs for supplying military outposts of the American southwest. The army had to maintain posts a days journey apart and keep them supplied with forage , or alternatively carry forage in separate wagons. The cost was astronomical. So in the 1850’s about 75 camels were brought to Texas and used to carry freight.

In the meantime these camels were also being used privately on ranches. It was while moving some of these camels that the nation’s first and only “camel cavalry charge” took place. In 1849 they were trying to cross the Colorado River into California with camels when a large war party of Mojaves showed up and looked ready to attack. The civilian laborers mounted the camels and charged, routing the Mojaves.

In 1860, experiments were made with racing camels. It was hoped the camels could be used to carry “camel express” mail. The racing experiments proved unsuccessful. Camels excelled at heavy loads carried slowly.

After 1860, Siberian camels were imported to San Franscisco, and ended up in Canadian mining operations. Eventually these were turned loose and became wild herds. In 1864 the decision was made to sell off the army’s remaining camels. Mules and horses could be used with less expense, and while the camels were good in the sand of the Middle East, the rocky terrain of the southwest damaged their feet and made them less reliable. These camels too were turned loose or escaped into the desert. Camel sightings were reported across Texas, Arizona, and California.

In the meantime, camel races and historical reenactments have become popular in towns that want to remember their historical camel roots and attract tourists during the winter months.

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Related posts:
Fifteen Hundred Saudi Camels Compete for Miss Camel Title
Camel cheese doesn’t play in Mauritania
My new camel avatar
The Ship of the Desert at Wadi Rhum (photo)
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Posted in Camels, Curiosities. Comments Off on Wild Camels in the Desert: Legacy of the U.S. Army Camel Corps

My new camel avatar

camel-avatar-72.jpgI have finally created an avatar.

Webster says an avatar is an incarnation or an embodiment of a concept or philosophy in a person. In the blogosphere, I suppose the Avatar represents your personality or the theme of your blog. So in keeping with my camel theme, and my own previous incarnation as a history major, I found a photo of a wall with camel hieroglyphics, and scanned a portion of it with a likely looking camel drawing. Now, whenever I post a comment, this camel will appear next to my words to represent me in the flesh.

I kind of like the way the two dimensional upper part of the camel flows into the stick figure legs. It’s sort of like the ancient graffiti artist was making an archaic graphic symbol.

The wall is at Wadi Rhum, where camels have been raised for generations. I don’t know what language the inscription is in or what it says. I suspect it is Greek–the Greeks had decapolis cities in Jordan.

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Related posts:
Fifteen Hundred Saudi Camels Compete for Miss Camel Title
Camel cheese doesn’t play in Mauritania
Wild Camels in the Desert: Legacy of the U.S. Army Camel Corps
The Ship of the Desert at Wadi Rhum (photo)
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Posted in Camels, Curiosities. Comments Off on My new camel avatar

The Ship of the Desert at Wadi Rhum (photo)

Posted in Arabs, Camels, Middle East. Comments Off on The Ship of the Desert at Wadi Rhum (photo)